CIFOR–ICRAF publishes over 750 publications every year on agroforestry, forests and climate change, landscape restoration, rights, forest policy and much more – in multiple languages.

CIFOR–ICRAF addresses local challenges and opportunities while providing solutions to global problems for forests, landscapes, people and the planet.

We deliver actionable evidence and solutions to transform how land is used and how food is produced: conserving and restoring ecosystems, responding to the global climate, malnutrition, biodiversity and desertification crises. In short, improving people’s lives.

Global pledges to restore degraded landscapes through ambitious tree planting initiatives have created an encouraging momentum in countries worldwide. But science shows that simply planting a tree isn’t enough: efforts require careful planning and investment to establish and maintain healthy, productive plantations.

CIFOR-ICRAF research on seedling management and tree planting aims to dispel common misconceptions and provide a critical evidence base for both policymakers and practitioners. In this way, we are supporting the development of viable and sustainable initiatives that ensure the momentum behind today’s tree growing investments carries benefits through to future generations. 

CONTACT

Manuel R. Guariguata

Head of CIFOR-ICRAF Peru

Tree planting: Fast facts

Of all possible land-based mitigation solutions, tree planting offers the highest potential for removing CO2 from the atmosphere

 

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Healthy soil is the foundation for functioning ecosystems including sustainable agricultural systems, rangelands, wetlands, peatlands and forests. Consequently, healthy soil is fundamental if we are to achieve land-based ecosystem restoration.

CIFOR-ICRAF’s state-of-the art soil spectroscopy lab and global database of ecosystem health indicators are one of the world’s best tools for large scale and accurate soil analytics. By conducting multi-scale assessments of land and soil health across landscapes, we are able to provide analysis at the farm, landscape and global levels. Providing robust and actionable scientific data and analysis and capacity development, our evidence draws links between soil health, climate change mitigation and adaptation, and biodiversity to inform policies and investment at multiple scales.

Learn more about our works on soil and land health and our state-of-the-art Soil-Plant Spectral Diagnostics Lab.

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Restoring degraded landscapes and depleted soils can help mitigate climate change, support sustainable livelihoods and maintain biodiversity – and is essential to supporting food security. But to effect real change on the ground, countries need more than technical solutions; they also need tools and approaches around finance, implementation, monitoring and conflict resolution. 

CIFOR-ICRAF is working to help countries meet their restoration targets as the world builds momentum to restore nearly 1 billion hectares of degraded land under commitments to the Rio Conventions and the Bonn Challenge1.

CONTACT

Manuel R. Guariguata

Head of CIFOR-ICRAF Peru

Forest and landscape restoration: Fast facts

150 million ha – area of degraded and deforested land to be restored by 2020 under the Bonn Challenge2
100 million ha – area of degraded forest landscapes in Africa to be restored by 2030 under AFR1003
20 million ha – area of degraded forest landscapes in Latin America and the Caribbean to be restored by 2020 under Initiative 20×204

 

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Whether their meals come from farms, forests or markets, rural communities need dependable and nutritious sources of food. Yet our food systems are threatened by unsustainable agricultural practices, deforestation and forest degradation, climate change and biodiversity loss. Diet transitions towards ultra-processed foods are contributing towards rising obesity and overweight all over the world.  In some places, shifting patterns of land use and productive activities are changing local diets, sometimes leading to an increased risk of malnutrition.

To help transform food systems, CIFOR-ICRAF is promoting the widescale adoption of agroecological approaches, including farmer-led strategies to increase tree cover and diversity across agricultural landscapes. And by providing evidence on how forests and trees contribute to people’s diets, we are raising awareness and influencing national policies to include forests and trees as part of national and local food systems.

CONTACT

Amy Ickowitz

Senior Scientist

Food security and nutrition: Fast facts

2X – The global demand for food is expected to double by 20501
75% of the world’s food is generated from only 12 plants and five animal species2
More than 50% of the world’s fruits and all of our nuts come from trees3

 

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Global heating is already leading to more and more destructive weather events and changes in weather and rainfall patterns that make planning for agriculture, forestry and resource management a serious challenge.

CIFOR-ICRAF and CIFOR Germany gGmbH aim to help mitigate climate change by helping to keep trees in the ground and to increase tree cover. Through our work on agroforestry, REDD+ (reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation), bioenergy, wetlands and blue carbon, we support the development and implementation of effective and equitable climate change policies and measures that reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Forests and trees are important safety nets for communities: many forest products are more resilient to climate variability and extremes than crops, and mangroves help reduce risks from cyclones and sea-level rise. Critically, trees on farms reduce local temperatures, modulate water flow and continue to yield products during times of scarcity. Our approach to climate change adaptation focuses on nature-based solutions, as well as risk management to support decision making that increases the resilience of land and development investments.

We are also researching ways to promote win-win outcomes for climate-smart agriculture and forests, to strengthen both our food systems and forest landscapes in the face of climate change. Through techniques like mulching, intercropping, agroforestry and better water management, along with better weather forecasting, climate-smart agriculture aims to increase food security and farm incomes, lower agricultural emissions and build resilience to climate stress and shocks.

Finally, we have started working on bioeconomy solutions. Leveraging multi-sector collaboration for creating bioeconomy solutions represents an ‘overlooked’ pathway to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, conserve biodiversity, and create equitable jobs and prosperity at global scale. Our Transformative Partnership Platform brings together key stakeholders from public and private sectors and civil society to achieve such transformational change (https://www.cifor.org/cbe). 

CONTACTS

Christopher Martius

Managing Director, CIFOR Germany gGmbH

Pham Thu Thuy

Team Leader, Climate change, energy & low-carbon development

Anne Larson

Team Leader, Governance, equity and well-being

Houria Djoudi

Senior Scientist

Bruno Locatelli

Seconded Scientist

Denis Sonwa

Senior Scientist

Climate change: Fast facts

Trees absorb nearly 1/3 of all global annual CO2 released from burning fossil fuels. But they can also release carbon – up to 23% of all annual emissions come from deforestation and land use change

 

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Inspired by natural ecosystems, agroecology combines local and scientific knowledge, and focuses on the interactions between plants, animals, humans and the environment. It seeks to build resilience in both livelihoods and landscapes, and address key knowledge and implementation gaps to support agroecological transitions.

CIFOR-ICRAF’s work on agroecology uses a systems approach to determine ‘Options by context’ (OxC), working closely with smallholder farmers to develop locally relevant innovations that will help them keep pace with the global demand for food without damaging the natural resources they need to produce it.

Ensuring soil health is a key agroecological principle. Our work focuses on managing soils to protect their ability to sequester carbon, store and regulate water and nutrients, and provide other ecosystem services.

CONTACT

Fergus Sinclair

Chief Scientist

Agroecology: Fast facts

An improved rice–fish–duck agroecosystem in China is estimated to have 7.8 times the economic value of the conventional hybrid rice monoculture model

 

Source: Zhang Y et al. 2017. A conservation approach of Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS). Sustainability 9(2):295.

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