CIFOR–ICRAF publishes over 750 publications every year on agroforestry, forests and climate change, landscape restoration, rights, forest policy and much more – in multiple languages.

CIFOR–ICRAF addresses local challenges and opportunities while providing solutions to global problems for forests, landscapes, people and the planet.

We deliver actionable evidence and solutions to transform how land is used and how food is produced: conserving and restoring ecosystems, responding to the global climate, malnutrition, biodiversity and desertification crises. In short, improving people’s lives.

Healthy soil is the foundation for functioning ecosystems including sustainable agricultural systems, rangelands, wetlands, peatlands and forests. Consequently, healthy soil is fundamental if we are to achieve land-based ecosystem restoration.

CIFOR-ICRAF’s state-of-the art soil spectroscopy lab and global database of ecosystem health indicators are one of the world’s best tools for large scale and accurate soil analytics. By conducting multi-scale assessments of land and soil health across landscapes, we are able to provide analysis at the farm, landscape and global levels. Providing robust and actionable scientific data and analysis and capacity development, our evidence draws links between soil health, climate change mitigation and adaptation, and biodiversity to inform policies and investment at multiple scales.

Learn more about our works on soil and land health and our state-of-the-art Soil-Plant Spectral Diagnostics Lab.

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More than simply ‘agriculture with trees’, agroforesty is an agroecological approach that involves farmers, livestock, trees and forests at multiple scales – including trees on farms, farming in forests and at forest margins and tree-crop production. It leverages the ability of trees to store carbon, draw water and nutrients from soil, shelter biodiversity, build soil organic matter and carbon, and record climate history.

Since the term agroforestry was coined in the late 1970s to describe the work of World Agroforestry (ICRAF), the concept has evolved greatly. CIFOR-ICRAF’s approach addresses the complexity of the interaction between people and ecological systems through a holistic systems approach.

Agroforestry: Fast facts

Restoring degraded land using agroforestry could increase food security for 1.3 billion people1
Agroforestry can reduce soil erosion by 50 per cent and increase soil carbon by 21%2

 

Sources:
1 Smith P et al. 2019. Interlinkages between desertification, land degradation, food security and greenhouse gas fluxes: Synergies, trade-offs and integrated response options. In Climate change and land. Shukla PR et al. (eds.). IPCC.
2 Muchane MN et al. 2020. Agroforestry boosts soil health in the humid and sub-humid tropics: A meta-analysis. Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment 295.

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Restoring degraded landscapes and depleted soils can help mitigate climate change, support sustainable livelihoods and maintain biodiversity – and is essential to supporting food security. But to effect real change on the ground, countries need more than technical solutions; they also need tools and approaches around finance, implementation, monitoring and conflict resolution. 

CIFOR-ICRAF is working to help countries meet their restoration targets as the world builds momentum to restore nearly 1 billion hectares of degraded land under commitments to the Rio Conventions and the Bonn Challenge1.

CONTACT

Manuel R. Guariguata

Head of CIFOR-ICRAF Peru

Forest and landscape restoration: Fast facts

150 million ha – area of degraded and deforested land to be restored by 2020 under the Bonn Challenge2
100 million ha – area of degraded forest landscapes in Africa to be restored by 2030 under AFR1003
20 million ha – area of degraded forest landscapes in Latin America and the Caribbean to be restored by 2020 under Initiative 20×204

 

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Fruits, nuts, leaves, bark, resin and other tree products are excellent sources of food, fibre and other ecosystem services. Many are rich in minerals and vitamins, and tree foods often provide people with a safety net in times of scarcity. Trees can protect the environment in both forests and agricultural landscapes by stabilizing and enriching the soil, drawing water and nutrients from deep in the ground and carbon from the air, providing fodder and shelter for livestock and create micro-climates. Yet the lack of quality tree-planting materials that are suited to location and purpose poses serious constraints to tree planting initiatives worldwide.

CIFOR-ICRAF is developing genetic resources to safeguard tree diversity, domesticate tree species, and provide growers with the best-suited planting material for their particular needs. Through collaborative research and development, we work with relevant institutions and networks to help boost the availability and access of quality seeds and materials, so that the right tree can be planted in the right place, for the right purpose.

CONTACTS

Ramni Jamnadass

Co-Team leader for trees and forest genetic resources, and biodiversity

Lars Graudal

Co-Team Leader, Trees and forest genetic resources, and biodiversity

Tree genetic resources (TGR): Fast facts

CIFOR-ICRAF genebanks support global and regional strategies for tree genetic resources conservation of at least 10 globally-important and 100 regionally-important food or income-generating tree species

 

Source: World Agroforestry. 2017. Corporate Strategy 2017-2026. Nairobi: World Agroforestry.

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